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Monthly Archives: December 2016

Mountaineer – Work In Progress (2): making a snow base

Medicine ‘Fried Awake’

Odd as it may seem, before making a snow base it’s important to decide what type of snow you want to represent – whether pristine, powdery snowdrifts; or slushy ice and snow, which is thawing. I chose to make this look like the snow had melted slightly:

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Materials used – still water, on the left, which is smooth and clear; and the gel-like version, which can be used to create texture, on the right:

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Crushed glass, on the left – this isn’t strictly necessary, and it’s quite dangerous; so it’s purely optional, but it does add a nice sparkle. On the right, snow flock:

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Pre-made icicles: 010

You make these by cutting small slivers of transparent plastic – such as the kind you get on blister packs – then painting them with successive layers of still water-effect. There is a short tutorial about this on SproketSmallWorld.

If you want snow to look white, rather than transparent, add some white paint to the water effect when mixing it with flock. I wanted it to have an icy appearance; so left the paint out of the mix.

Anyway, first attach the icicles using water effect as an adhesive – water effect shrinks slightly when it has cured, and so can change the angle of the icicles. To keep them vertical, I just use a bit of blue-tack to hold them in place:

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Building successive layers of snow is more effective than daubing-on one heavy application of the snow-mix. So, the first layer was stippled on using an old paintbrush:

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You can see how the snow becomes more opaque with additional layers:

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I dotted some onto the bridge, and the rails – a cocktail stick is helpful here:

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Finish by placing water effect in places where the snow looks heaviest, and sprinkling pure snow flock over these areas.

Finally, paint a thin layer of satin varnish over the snow:

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Done.

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Mountaineer – Work In Progress (1)

The High Violets ‘Sun Baby’

The beginning of a Blanchitsu-themed figure:

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Along with a skull-hopper:

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I had originally conceived of this figure and its companion as Scavvies, but they didn’t sit right with the rest of the models I made for the Necromunda diorama. Instead, they looked more like a pair of itinerant wanderers; plus, the gas-mask reminded me of a painting by the German artist, Otto Dix:

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Dix had fought in the First World War; and made a number of paintings depicting the brutality of the conflict. Probably his most famous one is ‘Trench Warfare’:

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So, I decided to characterize this model as a wounded veteran, of sorts. I didn’t want to make a direct replica of a WW1 battlefield; but I thought maybe some of the motifs – such as duckboards and tangled wire – would hint at it: 004

Also, I kind of want to make a wintry base – partly because I haven’t made one for years; but I think it would make a suitably bleak setting as well. I may change this, though – as I quite like the steampunk aesthetic; and a gloomy backdrop might be better – but we’ll see.

 

Redemptionists (15) – finished.

Lush ‘Deluxe’

Finally finished:

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I tend to avoid too much blood and gore as a rule; but I think it’s fair enough, once in a while:

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The Scavvies:

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The Redemptionists:

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The Bridge without any figures on it: 002

I will be starting a temporary work position next week, so the painting front may be a bit quiet for a month; but I intend to work on several small projects over Christmas, before starting something a bit more elaborate in the new year.

Redemptionists (14) – Redemptor Priest

The Three O’ Clock ‘Jet Fighter’ 

Probably the last work in progress update, as I’ve finished the models for this diorama now – but have one or two changes to make on the overall base:

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I decided not to use Latin for the book’s inscription, as it tends to be a bit overdone – I was going to paint runes, but somehow the model reminded me of the villain from Big Trouble In Little China; so I used Chinese symbols instead. They should stand for ‘redemption’ and ‘revelation’, but if I’ve got them wrong and they say something offensive then I blame the internet.

Redemptionists (13) – Karloth Valois/Painting Colour-Fades

Main Source ‘looking at the front door’

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I’ve finished the model of Karloth Valois, and thought it might be helpful to demonstrate how to apply a colour-fade technique: that is, blending one colour into another. You can create striking effects through mixing contrasting colours; but here I wanted to create an eerie scheme, of black fading into turquoise.

These were the colours used (the one without a label is khaki):

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Colour-fading relies on glazing. If you’re not sure what this is, I made a previous tutorial – it consists of applying very thin, transparent layers of paint. The aim is not so much to add a colour, but to alter an underlying one, and smooth-out different layers.

Basecoat – black:

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Layer – black + a small amount of turquoise:

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Layer – add more turquoise to the previous mix:

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Don’t worry if the layers look patchy at this stage, as glazing will smooth them out later on:

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You can see that it wasn’t quite pure turquoise at this stage – you can take it all the way up to that, of course; but I wanted to keep the overall tone quite dark:

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So, using the same black and turquoise mixture, add a small amount of khaki; and highlight edges/raised areas:

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The final highlight is pure khaki, used quite sparingly – I also painted on tears/holes:

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As you can see, at this stage, the highlights are quite stark, and look a bit incongruous:

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So, glazing will draw the various colours together, and harmonise them. As with any other painting, several thin layers are better than one heavy application. It’s important to let each layer dry before adding subsequent ones (this can be quite tedious, but it avoids one glaze washing away another).

I used three glazes: i) black ii) Thraka green iii) smoke brown:

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Although the colours haven’t come out quite right in the photograph, you should be able to see the difference that glazing makes:

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Done.

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