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Monthly Archives: March 2017

Make The Dead Glorious Again (6)

Built To Spill ‘carry the zero’ 

Just a work-in-progress update, really.

The folds on the steed’s caparison made a freehand design look too disordered – so I decided to make an ethereal glow effect, instead:

It’s maybe too faint, but until the rest of the figure has been painted it’s a bit difficult to tell:

I used these paints for the OSL – and found a gel-based glaze medium helpful, as the undulations of the plastic can make thin paint run uncontrollably:

 

Worth a look:

Painting metal armour (AlmostPerftec)

Making a forest backdrop (GardensOfHecate)

Using plastic sprues to create scenery (Weemen)

Making scenic bases (ColouredDust)

 

Make The Dead Glorious Again (5) – painting dark red

Alice Donut – In My Head

Red isn’t really my favourite colour to paint, as it’s a difficult colour to highlight properly without turning it into pink. However, to paint a dark red, I used these paints:

 

Basecoat – Rhinox Hide:

Layer – Rhinox Hide + Burnt Cadmium Red:

Shade – i) Rhinox Hide + Black (all over) ii) black (recesses):

Layer – Burnt Cadmium Red (I added a small amount of Rhinox Hide to this, to make the transition smoother; but it’s not vital):

Layer – Burnt Cadmium Red + Red Gore:

Layer – Red Gore:

Layer – Red Gore + Red:

Layer – Red:

Edge highlight – i) red + Troll Slayer Orange ii) Troll Slayer Orange iii) Troll Slayer Orange + Goldbrown. To paint rips/tears – use black + Rhinox Hide; and then edge highlight these with the aforementioned mixture:

To finish the red, glaze with smoke.

It looked a bit plain at this stage; and the outside of the cloak doesn’t lend itself to freehand – as you can see, the holes and the deep recesses leave very little of the surface area flat enough to paint a design on.

So, I painted a glow instead, using green:

I will have to work on removing the glossiness. The colours came out slightly better on the rider’s body:

The underside of the cloak lent itself a bit more easily to freehand work:

I haven’t painted a submerged pattern before (i.e. the white crosses); and I’m a bit ambivalent about the results here – so we’ll have to see if it can be improved.

Make The Dead Glorious Again (4) – painting bone

In Bed ‘Happy’ 

Given the complexity of this model, I thought it would be best to break it down into stages. So, how to paint the bone areas of the horse.

The main colours were Rakarth Flesh and Khaki for the bone colour itself:

To make a generic wash for the whole model, including the bones, I made a mix of black + smoke + tank brown; and added matt medium, as vallejo paints can sometimes be glossy:

Basecoat – rakarth flesh:

Apply the shading wash – several thin layers are better than one heavy application:

Layer – Khaki:

Highlight – Khaki + rakarth flesh:

Highlight – pure rakarth flesh:

I added chips and cracks using dark brown; then edge-highlighted these and the rest of the bone areas with rakarth flesh, plus a small amount of white:

It’s important not to use pure white on the horse’s bones, as the rider will be the focal point of the model, and so needs to be slightly brighter than the horse. An additional layer of highlighting will accomplish that.

Finally, glaze with a thin layer of smoke to unify the bone areas:

Done.

To be honest, painting larger models this way can be quite tedious, as each layer of paint is very thin; meaning that several coats of each colour need to be painted on. Drybrushing is a faster method; and will give a good bone effect, if you lack time/patience for painting lots of layers.

I did try this initially:

Unfortunately, with this being a heavily converted model, it had to be painted fully-assembled; which made drybrushing the recessed areas impossible.

I will make tutorials on painting the metal areas next; and then the freehand elements – which I still haven’t figured out yet.

Make The Dead Glorious Again (3) – how to use crackle paste

Sixpence None The Richer ‘love, salvation, the fear of death’

Following on from the last post, I thought it may be helpful to demonstrate how to use crackle paste. This can be very expensive – whether it’s sold as crackle paste, or crackle paint, so it’s best to shop around; but it creates much better effects than crackle medium.

Basecoating with textured paint aids adhesion – by its nature, crackle paste can flake off from sheer surfaces. So, I used red oxide paint here:

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Crackle paste:

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Apply with a spatula, or something similar, as the paste is very sticky and doesn’t apply well when brushed onto surfaces:

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Cover the base – I made slight variations in thickness, as the thinner the coat of paste the smaller the cracks are, while a heavy application results in larger cracks:

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As it begins to dry, cracks appear:

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Nearly there:

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Done – although it’s best to leave it overnight, just be sure. Once fully dry, it can be painted over:

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The base itself is pretty much finished, though I intend to mount it on a board when the diorama itself is complete:

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I was going to paint the eagle up as an albino bird, to contrast with the carrion crow; but thought that a phoenix would make for better symbolism, and look more colourful:

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The colours were based on the phoenix birds, from the portal of Nadir Divan-Beghi madrasah.

Make The Dead Glorious Again (2) – painting the base

Stretch Princess ‘Sugar’ 

You can see the materials the base was made from – namely sand, multi-purpose filler to create the dunes, red oxide paste to cover gaps, and chipped wood pieces (in this case taken from the local park):


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In order to ensure it would look warm, it was undercoated white:

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To paint the sand, these were the paints used:

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Basecoat tank-brown, then drybrush: 1) flat-earth 2) plague brown 3) zamesi desert 4) ushabti bone. Glaze with smoke to finish – then dust with pigments. I made a previous tutorial on how to do this here.

Crackle paste was used to create the dry river-bed effect:

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I forgot to take step-by-step photos of this; but it was Decoart paste, which you apply with a spatula (or something similar), leave to dry, then paint over. It was then brushed with pigments, to create the dusty effect.