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Monthly Archives: April 2017

Make The Dead Glorious Again (10) – work in progress: Arabian horse

Stretch Princess ‘J.W.B.A.’

I was going to paint the horse white, but thought that grey looked less Elven:

Horses can be tricky to paint, as they’re not really like any other models – having large areas which are smooth and curved; with a fairly unique type of skin. Heavy shading can make them look gaunt, rather than sleek; so it’s helpful not to use overly dark colours in the recessed parts.

With that in mind, the grey skin was basecoated with USA Olive Brown; then highlighted by applying successive layers of the brown + increased amounts of Dark Sea Grey:

The horse’s hair was painted similarly – but using rakarth flesh, instead of dark sea grey; and adding final highlights of white in select places to create a faint sheen.

To paint the nose/mouth area, create a basecoat of black + earth; then highlight by adding Cadian fleshtone to the mix. Finish by adding Kislev flesh to this mixture:


Finish by glazing the horse all over with several thin layers of USA olive brown.

I intend to paint the horse’s armour as turquoise marble; but I have a feeling it won’t look right, and may require a different design – we will see, however.

Make the Dead Glorious Again (9) – Undead Horseman finished (give or take)

Fourwaycross ‘shimmer’

I’ve finished the undead horseman; though some aspects don’t look quite the way I want them to, so I may adjust these at a later date – but taking a break by working on something else often helps, as it grants you a bit more objectivity.

As it is, however:

To be honest, this was a real pain to paint; and I’m glad to put it aside.

I will begin painting the Arabian horsewoman now; though I haven’t planned it out fully yet. Hopefully it will prove a bit less arduous than the undead horseman did, though.

Make The Dead Glorious Again (8) – painting freehand banners

The Three O’Clock ‘A Day In Erotica’

Freehand designs can be a bit daunting. Rather than be put-off, however, if you approach them methodically, they become more straightforward.

It’s helpful to draw a sketch of your design before painting it. I would also recommend using a wet palette, as it delays the drying time of paint; and therefore makes it easier to maintain its consistency – as you don’t need to keep adding water to it at intervals. I find this especially beneficial when painting finelines.

Paint the background – in this case, red and white stripes:

This was shaded with a fairly generic black+brown wash:

Use dots to plot-out your design:

Add plot-lines to help structure the design:

The same method of dots/lines was then used to paint the overall emblem:

Fill the lines in with grey:

I used this coat for the body, but painted the crown, claws, and shield their base-colours (I painted the tongue last, as I wasn’t sure what colour to use at this stage):

Shade with the same black+brown wash as before:

Paint the details as you would any other miniature – highlighting and shading as normal:

I added a scroll:

Painting lettering is very painstaking, and I’m not especially good at it – my handwriting is dreadful; but it’s beneficial to begin in the middle, which helps you to space the letters out evenly:

Then paint the letters at the furthest edges:

Before painting the remainder:

At this stage, it’s good to tidy-up and sharpen any areas which need refining. The photo reveals a few misplaced brushstrokes, which I hadn’t noticed – so I will re-touch these. I finished by glazing the whole banner with a very thin layer of brown.

However, no matter how complex a design is, as long as you break it down into small stages, it should look effective once finished:

 

Make The Dead Glorious Again (7) – work in progress

Tears For Fears ‘Pale Shelter’ 

I’ve finished the skeletal steed/horseman – except for the banner (and its pole), as it still needs planning out properly; which is why the cloak hasn’t been attached yet:

I decided to make the object source lighting effect stronger, and to remove one of the horns from the helmet, as it looked a bit off, somehow:

The glow effect just requires stippling progressively lighter shades of green, with a final dotting of yellow+white in select places; and then being given a thin glaze of dark green to finish. I think it looks more effective – and to be honest, stippling is much easier than blending, given the heavy folds on the caparison.